crownedrose:

jtotheizzoe:

Dust is pretty amazing stuff.

Check out more dusty science in this week’s It’s Okay To Be Smart:

(Apologies for not including dusts of the pixie, angel, and bowl varieties in the video)

And here’s another great video to watch!

648 notes

nybg:

spectacularuniverse:

Meet the pollen-gilded bat (Phyllonycteris poeyi), really living up to its name. This species, from eastern Cuba, has specialised fur that grips onto pollen, creating a very handy moveable feast.Read more

At the risk of alienating those among our followers who are bat-haters, look at this dude. Also known as the Cuban flower bat, its wingspan can actually reach 14”. The flower it’s sitting in (Talipariti elatum)just happens to be a relative of the already large-bloomed hibiscus. Not exactly a bumble bee of a bat, sizewise. —MN

nybg:

spectacularuniverse:

Meet the pollen-gilded bat (Phyllonycteris poeyi), really living up to its name. This species, from eastern Cuba, has specialised fur that grips onto pollen, creating a very handy moveable feast.

Read more

At the risk of alienating those among our followers who are bat-haters, look at this dude. Also known as the Cuban flower bat, its wingspan can actually reach 14”. The flower it’s sitting in (Talipariti elatum)just happens to be a relative of the already large-bloomed hibiscus. Not exactly a bumble bee of a bat, sizewise. —MN

2,329 notes

thenewenlightenmentage:

What Does Sound Look Like?
When light passes between areas of different air density, it bends. You’ve probably noticed the way distant pavement seems to shimmer on a hot day, or the way stars appear to twinkle. You’re seeing light that has been distorted as it passes through varying air densities, which are in turn created by varying temperatures and pressures.
In the mid-19th century, German physicist August Toepler invented a photography technique called Schlieren Flow Visualization to visually capture these changes in density. The setup is a bit hard to explain in words (watch the video above for a full explanation) but it allows scientists and engineers to see things that are normally invisible: the rising heat from a candle, the turbulence around an airplane wing, the plume of a sneeze.
Continue Reading

thenewenlightenmentage:

What Does Sound Look Like?

When light passes between areas of different air density, it bends. You’ve probably noticed the way distant pavement seems to shimmer on a hot day, or the way stars appear to twinkle. You’re seeing light that has been distorted as it passes through varying air densities, which are in turn created by varying temperatures and pressures.

In the mid-19th century, German physicist August Toepler invented a photography technique called Schlieren Flow Visualization to visually capture these changes in density. The setup is a bit hard to explain in words (watch the video above for a full explanation) but it allows scientists and engineers to see things that are normally invisible: the rising heat from a candle, the turbulence around an airplane wing, the plume of a sneeze.

Continue Reading

1,049 notes

malformalady:

Graveyard of trees: The milky green water is a natural phenomenon caused by electromagnetic activity from the lightning hitting the water’s surface surrounding dead trees
Photo credit: Julie Fletcher

malformalady:

Graveyard of trees: The milky green water is a natural phenomenon caused by electromagnetic activity from the lightning hitting the water’s surface surrounding dead trees

Photo credit: Julie Fletcher

28,396 notes

tedx:

At TEDxYouth@Manchester, genetics researcher Dan Davis introduces the audience to compatibility genes — key players in our immune system’s functioning, and the reason why it’s so difficult to transplant organs from person to person: one’s compatibility genes must match another’s for a transplant to take.

To learn more about these fascinating genes, watch the whole talk here»

(Images from Davis’s talk, Drew Berry’s animations, and the TED-Ed lessons A needle in countless haystacks: Finding habitable worlds - Ariel Anbar and How we conquered the deadly smallpox virus - Simona Zompi)

12,028 notes

a-cumberbatch-of-cookies:

itscolossal:

This is what happens when you run water through a 24hz sine wave.

You mean witchcraft. This is what happens when you run water through WITCHCRAFT.

35,503 notes

Seemingly unaware of my presence, these young men talked about their plans to fuck as many girls from other racial/ethnic groups as they could “catch” before graduation. They “ran” it down. Black girls were high on the list, Native American girls hard to find, Asian girls (all lumped into the same category), deemed easier to entice, were considered “prime targets.” Talking about this over-heard conversation with my students, I found that it was commonly accepted that one “shopped” for sexual partners in the same way one “shopped” for courses at Yale, and that race and ethnicity was a serious category on which selections were based. To these young males and their buddies, fucking was a way to confront the Other, as well as a way to make themselves over, to leave behind white “innocence” and enter the world of “experience.” As is often the case in this society, they were confident that non-white people had more life experience, were more worldly, sensual, and sexual because they were different. Getting a bit of the Other, in this case engaging in sexual encounters with non-white females, was considered a ritual of transcendence, a movement out into a world of difference that would transform, an acceptable rite of passage.

bell hooks, Eating the Other (via goleyaas)

This is why it makes me mad when people say they’re into someone who is “ethnic”, it just means they’re into the idea of someone’s race, wanting a part of it, and to acquire that or I guess “taste” that culture they try and sleep with someone who is labeled “ethnic”. Often people who are considered “ethnic” are either hyper-sexualized and are seen as “dominant” and aggressive almost animalistic while others are seen as submissive “slaves” for the “masters” to control and dominate and use. There is no in between or normalcy when it comes to People of Color, the “ethnic” group of people, which is a group label usually made up by white people but it’s not limited to just them.

(via loohn)

*VOMITS*

(via searchingforknowledge)

White people are cannibalistic in that way because they’ll destroy and harm and use as many of us to satisfy their hunger (be it sex, resources, etc). They look at us as the other but really their just killing parts of themselves via us, people they don’t see as human. -_-

(via strugglingtobeheard)

2,679 notes

hifructosemag:

Earlier this year Beijing artist Li Hongbo opened his first solo exhibition titled, Pure White Paper in Australia at Dominik Mersch Gallery featuring his flexible sculptures made of common paper. Each sculpture is comprised of thousands of sheets of paper manually glued on top of each other in a sort of honeycomb composition allowing the layers to be pulled and stretched like an accordion. These paper stacks are then cut and sculpted using an electric saw into figurative forms. See the video of the Pure White Paperexhibition below!

466 notes

towritelesbiansonherarms:

fer1972:

The WolfmanWolfspark Werner Freund is a wolf sanctuary spread over 25 acres in western Germany. It is home to 29 wolves — six distinct packs hailing from Europe, Siberia, Canada, the Arctic, and Mongolia. Researcher Werner Freund, 79, a former German paratrooper, established the sanctuary in 1972 and has raised more than 70 animals there over the last 40 years. He acquired the wolves as cubs from zoos or animal parks and has reared them mostly by hand. Werner has also taken to living closely with his wolves, behaving as an alpha male to earn their acceptance and respect. Reuters photographer Lisi Niesner recently spent some time with Freund and his wolves, capturing the interactions between these old friends. 

This is what i plan to do when i’m mad rich

3,948 notes

thenewenlightenmentage:

Michio Kaku: Space Bubble Baths and the Free Universe

Every week, Dr. Michio Kaku will be answering reader questions about physics and futuristic science. If you have a question for Dr. Kaku, just post it in the comments section below and check back on Wednesdays to see if he answers it.

This week Dr. Kaku addresses the question of how you can create a universe from nothing. “If you calculate the total matter of the universe it is positive,” Dr. Kaku says. “If you calculate the total energy of the universe it is negative, because of gravity.” So what happens when you add the two together? Zero. “So it takes no energy to create a universe,” Dr. Kaku points out. “Universes are for free. A universe is a free lunch.”

87 notes